Comic explainer: forest giants house thousands of animals (so why do we keep cutting them down?)

File 20181129 170241 np8k0s.png?ixlib=rb 1.1
Wes Mountain/The Conversation, CC BY-ND

Madeleine De Gabriele, The Conversation and Wes Mountain, The Conversation

Giant eucalypts play an irreplaceable part in many of Australia’s ecosystems. These towering elders develop hollows, which make them nature’s high-rises, housing everything from endangered squirrel-gliders to lace monitors. Over 300 species of vertebrates in Australia depend on hollows in large old trees.

These “skyscraper trees” can take more than 190 years to grow big enough to play this nesting and denning role, yet developers are cutting them down at an astounding speed. In other places, such as Victoria’s Central Highlands Mountain Ash forests, the history of logging and fire mean that less than 1.2% of the original old-growth forest remains (that supports the highest density of large old hollow trees). And it’s not much better in other parts of our country.

David Lindenmayer explains how these trees form, the role they play – and how very hard they are to replace.




Read more:
Mountain ash has a regal presence: the tallest flowering plant in the world


Wes Mountain/The Conversation, CC BY-ND



Read more:
The plan to protect wildlife displaced by the Hume Highway has failed



Sign up to Beating Around the Bush, a series that profiles native plants: part gardening column, part dispatches from country, entirely Australian.The Conversation

Madeleine De Gabriele, Deputy Editor: Energy + Environment, The Conversation and Wes Mountain, Multimedia Editor, The Conversation

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Revealed: the extent of job-swapping between public servants and fossil fuel...

0
This was the same firm that Robb had publicly defended when it controversially acquired a 99-year lease for the Port of Darwin in 2015. Two...

Forest giants house thousands of animals (so why do we keep...

0
Comic explainer: forest giants house thousands of animals (so why do we keep cutting them down?) Wes Mountain/The Conversation, CC BY-ND Madeleine De Gabriele, The Conversation...

Sick of Selfish Drivers Parking in Disabled Parking Spaces?

0
I fume every time I see some ignorant selfish di*khead driver act as though 'god created disability parking spaces' for their myopic self centered...

Media freedom is at risk when Nine hosts a Liberal fundraiser

0
The money-raising hosted by Nine had none of the sleaziness and claimed illegality of the $100,000 donation a Chinese property developer allegedly delivered to...

Banking Royal Commission’s damning report: ‘Things are so bad that new...

0
Banking Royal Commission's damning report: 'Things are so bad that new laws might not help' Peter Martin, The Conversation Royal Commissioner Kenneth Hayne has identified “greed”...

Senior ministers deal death blow to Malcolm Turnbull’s prime ministership

0
Senior ministers deal death blow to Malcolm Turnbull's prime ministership Michaelia Cash and Mathias Cormann have delivered the death blow to the prime ministership of...

The Five Rules of Buying Political Influence

0
All this stuff about Sam Dastyari - but what about poor Huang Xiangmo? Bloke turns up here, observes how business has been traditionally done, pulls...

How one think tank poisoned Australia’s climate debate

0
One of the Institute of Public Affair's greatest successes has been to stitch climate denialism into the very fabric of the conservative political identity. From...

Negative gearing changes will affect us all, mostly for the better

0
Negative gearing changes will affect us all, mostly for the better Don’t have a negatively geared investment property? You’re in good company. Despite all the talk...

Gambling industry finds plenty of political guns for hire to defend...

0
Gambling industry finds plenty of political guns for hire to defend the status quo Stephen Conroy is to head up a new gambling industry body,...

Government advertising may be legal, but it’s corrupting our electoral process

0
The Coalition government’s use of taxpayer money for political advertising – as much as A$136 million since January, according to Labor figures - is far...

How to transition from coal: 4 lessons for Australia from around...

0
How to transition from coal: 4 lessons for Australia from around the world Chris Briggs, University of Technology Sydney; Elsa Dominish, University of Technology Sydney,...

Web Hosting