Dirty Power: Big Coal’s dirty network of influence over both sides of Australian Government

0
1510

Lobbyists, Influencers, Insiders

If you’ve ever wondered why so many Australians oppose coal, but coal keeps coming out of the ground, then a new short film by Greenpeace’s investigative unit is probably going to help shed some light for you.


But be warned, it’s short and sharp and very dense with information, and it’s probably going to leave you feeling nauseous. At the very least angry.
Dirty Power is a collaboration between one of the world’s foremost environmental organisations, one of the nation’s best investigative journalists, and one of the country’s most talented film-makers.
Says a Greenpeace spokesperson: “Dirty Power tells a compelling story of the coal industry at the centre of a network of influence with industry, media, lobbyist and political arms, designed to further its interests and block action on climate change.
“Case studies of the impact of the network that the report looks at include Adani’s groundwater approval, the $444 grant to the Great Barrier Reef Foundation, and the favourable treatment of Trevor St Baker’s coal assets.
“The report is based on investigative work by journalist Michael West and Simone Marsh, who we brought on to conduct interviews with dozens of political staffers, executives of external lobby firms, and resources sector analysts; uncover previously hidden details about the identity and background of federal ministers’ parliamentary staff; and analyse publicly available information about listed companies and their operatives.”
Chris Phillips is behind the film-making, and on that front, this short film is a pretty stunning example of condensing an enormous amount of very complex information into a short format that is easy to follow.
You can watch it below, and follow Greenpeace Australia Pacific here. And you can find out more info about Dirty Power and the coal industry here.

Political donations reform is overdue — Labor shouldn’t waste time with...

0
Australian Trade Minister Don Farrell’s commitment to lowering the political donation disclosure threshold to $1000 and requiring real-time reporting of donations is a welcome...

Political donations 2017-18: search all the declarations by Australian parties

0
Today Australian voters have discovered who was bankrolling the nation’s political parties more than 18 months ago. Gambling lobby gave $500,000 to Liberals ahead of...

How a power station sold for peanuts became a $730 million...

0
It might rank as the deal of the century — but an appalling result for New South Wales taxpayers. In November 2015, the NSW Government...

The Coalition says the silliest things about economic management

0
Riddle me this: if “free market” politicians think that the role of governments is to get out of the way, then what do they do all...

Democracy’s danger hidden in plain sight

0
We obsess over our pollies’ private flaws and peccadilloes and call this politics when actually it’s just gossip. But when it comes to researching...

Big four accounting firms avoid scrutiny in multinational tax avoidance

0
Not convinced: Labor Senator and tax avoidance inquiry committee Chair Sam Dastyari says corporate tax cheats should be named and shamed by the tax...

The big con: how neoliberals (Liberal & National Party) convinced us...

0
The big con: how neoliberals convinced us there wasn't enough to go around Richard DennisAustralia just experienced one of the biggest mining booms in world...

Google accounts show 11 billion euros moved via low tax ‘Dutch...

0
Google moved 10.7 billion euros ($12 billion) through the Netherlands to Bermuda in 2014, as part of a structure which allows it to earn...

Ministers’ diaries: taxpayers deserve transparency on what MPs are doing

0
The states that already allow their citizens to have some idea of what their highly paid ministers are doing are extending that transparency, yet...