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Intelligence. Is it one dimensional?

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Intelligence Isn’t Black-and-White.

There Are Actually 8 Different Kinds.

What does it mean when someone calls you smart or intelligent?
According to developmental psychologist Howard Gardner, it could mean one eight things.

In this video interview, Dr. Gardner addresses his eight classifications for intelligence: writing, mathematics, music, spatial, kinesthetic, interpersonal, and intrapersonal.

Howard Gardner is a developmental psychologist and the John H. and Elisabeth A. Hobbs Professor of Cognition and Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He holds positions as Adjunct Professor of Psychology at Harvard University and Senior Director of Harvard Project Zero.

Howard Gardner: Currently I think there are eight intelligences that I’m very confident about and a few more that I’ve been thinking about. I’ll share that with our audience.

The first two intelligences are the ones which IQ tests and other kind of standardized tests valorize and as long as we know there are only two out of eight, it’s perfectly fine to look at them.

orators

Linguistic intelligence is how well you’re able to use language. It’s a kind of skill that poets have, other kinds of writers; journalists tend to have linguistic intelligence, orators.

 

The second  intelligence is logical mathematical intelligence. As the name implies logicians, mathematicians, scientists have that kind of intelligence. They’re able to do matEinstienhematical proofs. They’re able to do scientific reasoning and experimentation. And it’s great to have language and logical intelligence because most tests really focus on that. And if you do well in those tests as long as you stay in school, you think you’re smart. But if you ever walk out into Broadway or the highway or into the woods or into a farm, you then find out that other intelligences are at least this important.

So the third intelligence is musical intelligence and that’s the capacity to appreciate different kinds of musics, violinistto produce the music by voice or by an instrument or to conduct music. And people say well music is a talent. It’s not an intelligence. And I say well why if you’re good with words is that an intelligence, but if yoBBKing_Ovalmasku’re good with tones and rhythms and timbres nobody’s ever given me a good answer which is why it makes sense to talk about musical intelligence. And at certain cultures over history, musical intelligence has been very important.

The fourth intelligence is spatial intelligence.  That’s the intelligence which allows us to handle and work in space that’s close by. A chess player would have spatial intelligence. A surgeon would have spatial intelligence. But there’s another variety of spatial intelligence which we use for a much broader navigation. That’s what an airplane pilot or a sea captain would have. How do you find your way around large territory and large space.imilarly with the fifth intelligence, bodily kinesthetic intelligence, it comes in two flavors. One flavor is the ability to use your whole body to solve problems or to make things. And athletes and dancers would have that Gymnistkind of bodily kinesthetic intelligence. But another variety is being able to use your hands or other parts of your body to solve problems or make things. A craftperson would have bodily kinesthetic intelligence even if they weren’t particularly a good athlete or dancer.

The sixth intelligence and seventh intelligence have to do with human beings. Interpersonal intelligence is how you understand other people, how you motivate them, how you lead them, how you work with them, how you cooperate with them. Anybody at any workplace with other people needs interpersonal intelligence. Leaders hopefully have a lot of interpersonal intelligence. But any intelligence can be used in a pernicious way so the salesman that sells you something you don’t want for a price you don’t want to pay, he or she has got interpersonal intelligence. It’s just not being used in a way that we might prefer.

The seventh kind of intelligence is difficult to assess, but it’s very important. It’s intrapersonal intelligence. It’s understanding yourself. If we go back a way in history and prehistory, knowledge of yourself probably wasn’t that important because people did what their parents or grandparents did whether they were hunters or fisherman or craftspeople. But nowadays especially in developed society, people lead their own lives. We follow our own careers. We often switch careers. We don’t necessarily live at home as we get older. And if you don’t have a good understanding of yourself, you are in big trouble.So that’s intrapersonal intelligence.

The eighth intelligence which I added some years ago is the naturalist intelligence. And that’s the capacity to make important, relevant discriminations in the world of naturnaturee between one plant and another, between one animal and another. It’s the intelligence of the naturalist, the intelligence of Charles Darwin.

I missed it the first go around when I wrote about it, but I tried to atone by adding it to my list.

And, by the way, you might say well but nature isn’t so important anymore.

But in fact everything we do in the commercial world uses our naturalist intelligence. Why do I buy this jacket rather than another one? This sweater rather than another one? One hair style rather than another? Those all make just the naturalist intelligence because the brain is very adaptive. And when an old use of a brain center no longer is relevant, it gets hijacked for something new.

So we’re all using our naturalist intelligence even if we never walk out into the woods or into the savannah of East Asia. The two other intelligences which I’m interested in, one of them is called the teaching or pedagogical intelligence. The intelligence which allows us to be able to teach successfully to other people. Now you could have two people who have exactly the same expertise and knowledge in the field, but one is a very good teacher and the other isn’t. That probably doesn’t surprise individuals so much.

But what got me fascinated was as young as two or three, kids already know how to teach. Now what does that mean? You show a child how to do something — let’s say a three- or four-year-old and then you ask the child to explain it to an older person or to a younger person. child_scientistAnd even the three- or four-year-old will explain it very differently to a young person, will go through details, point things, and speak slowly. And with an older person it would be much more elliptical and say well you do this and that and then you can figure it out. So that shows as young as three, let’s say, we already have teaching intelligence. The other one is one which I think is going to be difficult to prove to a skeptic, but I call it existential intelligence.

And existential intelligence is the intelligence of big questions. Philosophical questions, artistic questions. What does it mean to love? Why do we die? What’s going to be in the future? My pet bird might have more musical intelligence. The rats who are scurrying around the floor might have more spatial intelligence. But no other animals have existential intelligence. Part of the human condition is to think about questions of existence. And I like to say every five-year-old has existential intelligence because five-year-old are always asking why this, why that.

But the difference between a five-year-old and a philosopher is the five-year-old doesn’t pay too much attention to the answer whereas philosophers and other people who develop existential intelligence are really very interested in how we attack questions like that.

So again whether there’s eight intelligences or 10 or 12 is less important to me than having broken the monopoly of a single intelligence which sort of labels you for all time.

I think if we lived forever, we could probably develop each intelligence to a very high degree. But life is very short and if you devote too much attention to one intelligence, you’re not going to have much time to work on other kinds of intelligences.

And so the big question is should you play to strength or should you bolster weakness? And that’s a value judgment. Scientists cannot give you an answer to that. If, for example, you want to be a jack of all trades and be very well-rounded then probably you’re going to want to nurture the intelligences which aren’t that strong.

If, on the other hand, you’re dead set on really coming to the top of some particular heap, then you’re probably going to find the intelligences that you’re strongest at and really push those. And, you know, if a parent came to me and said well should we supplement or should we accentuate, I would say well tell me what you would like your child to do. Or better let the child tell you what he or she wants to do rather than say well science says you should do one or the other. I think it’s a question of values, not of science.

Some people think there’s such a thing as humor intelligence. But, in fact, I don’t. I think humor intelligence is simply the operation of a logical intelligence in some realm like human nature or physical nature or the workplace. And what happens is in humor, there’s a certain expectation and you flip that expectation so it’s logic but it’s logic that’s played out in different kinds of ways.

People had mentioned there’s such a thing as a chefcooking intelligence, a humor intelligence, and a sexual intelligence.

And I quipped well that can’t be intelligences because I don’t have any of them.

The 25 ‘Worst Passwords’ of 2015

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The password management consultants at SplashData recently released their annual edition of its “Worst Passwords List”—and it’s not exactly the most reassuring compilation of security-protecting entry codes.

SplashData’s fifth annual “Worst Passwords List” shows people continue putting themselves at risk

While longer passwords debut on this year’s list of most commonly used passwords, they are not necessarily more secure

LOS GATOS, CA – SplashData has announced the 2015 edition of its annual “Worst Passwords List” highlighting the insecure password habits of Internet users. “123456” and “password” once again reign supreme as the most commonly used passwords, as they have since SplashData’s first list in 2011, demonstrating how people’s choices for passwords remain consistently risky.

In SplashData’s fifth annual report, compiled from more than 2 million leaked passwords during the year, some new and longer passwords made their debut – perhaps showing an effort by both websites and web users to be more secure. However, the longer passwords are so simple as to make their extra length virtually worthless as a security measure.

Click here to download as a pdf

TeamsID-IG-Worst-Password-V3For example, “1234567890”, “1qaz2wsx” (first two columns of main keys on a standard keyboard), and “qwertyuiop” (top row of keys on a standard keyboard) all appear in the top 25 list for the first time, but they are each based on simple patterns that would be easily guessable by hackers.

As in past years’ lists, simple numerical passwords remain common, with six of the top 10 passwords on the 2015 list comprised of numbers only.

Sports remain a popular password theme. While baseball may be America’s pastime, “football” has overtaken it as a popular password. Both appear in the Top 10 of SplashData’s list, with “football” climbing three spots to number seven and “baseball” dropping two spots to number 10.

When it comes to movies and pop culture, The Force may be able to protect the Jedi, but it won’t secure users who choose popular Star Wars terms such as “starwars,” “solo,” and “princess” as their passwords. All three terms are new entries on this year’s list.

0b95e111-splashdata-ebook-worst-passwords-v3-updated_07h07m07h07m000000Click here to download our eBook, Worst Passwords: What We Have Learned From Five Years of Studying the Internet’s Most Commonly Used Passwords

Other passwords appearing on the 2015 list that did not appear on the 2014 list include “welcome”, “login” and “passw0rd.”

SplashData, provider of password management applications including SplashID for consumers and TeamsID for businesses, releases its annual list in an effort to encourage the adoption of stronger passwords to improve Internet security. According to SplashData, the passwords evaluated for the 2015 list were mostly held by users in North America and Western Europe. The “Worst Passwords List” shows that many people continue to put themselves at risk for hacking and identity theft by using weak, easily guessable passwords.

“We have seen an effort by many people to be more secure by adding characters to passwords, but if these longer passwords are based on simple patterns they will put you in just as much risk of having your identity stolen by hackers,” said Morgan Slain, CEO of SplashData. “As we see on the list, using common sports and pop culture terms is also a bad idea. We hope that with more publicity about how risky it is to use weak passwords, more people will take steps to strengthen their passwords and, most importantly, use different passwords for different websites.”

Presenting SplashData’s “Worst Passwords of 2015”:

Rank Password Change from 2014
1 123456 Unchanged
2 password Unchanged
3 12345678 Up 1
4 qwerty Up 1
5 12345 Down 2
6 123456789 Unchanged
7 football Up 3
8 1234 Down 1
9 1234567 Up 2
10 baseball Down 2
11 welcome New
12 1234567890 New
13 abc123 Up 1
14 111111 Up 1
15 1qaz2wsx New
16 dragon Down 7
17 master Up 2
18 monkey Down 6
19 letmein Down 6
20 login New
21 princess New
22 qwertyuiop New
23 solo New
24 passw0rd New
25 starwars New

 

SplashData offers three simple tips to help people protect themselves:

  1. Use passwords or passphrases of twelve characters or more with mixed types of characters
  2. Avoid using the same password over and over again on different websites
  3. Use a password manager such as SplashID to organize and protect passwords, generate random passwords, and automatically log into websites

For more information on SplashData’s last five years of research into commonly used passwords, please visit: http://content.teamsid.com/worst-passwords-ebook

Factions, political hacks and despots

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A mooted succession plan in Bronwyn Bishop’s Sydney seat has been denounced by local Liberal party members as “North Korean nepotism”.

Damien Jones, a former chief of staff to Bishop and a key figure in the “choppergate” scandal, has long been understood to have ambitions to succeed the MP for the northern beaches electorate of Mackellar.

It's only money!
40 years in Parliament and still getting entitlements wrong!

The New South Wales Liberal party on Tuesday opened nominations for 22 Liberal-held federal seats, including Mackellar, which Bishop has represented since 1994. It comes amid anger within Liberal party ranks over factional manoeuvring across NSW, with the moderates said to be on the march against conservative MPs and senators.

Office fitouts, charter flights instead of business class, etc.,
How to spend a million dollars in 6 months

Ruddock, who entered parliament in 1973 and served as immigration minister in the Howard government, is also under pressure to retire. Sources said a former executive director of the Menzies ­Research Centre, Julian Leeser, was likely to win preselection for Ruddock’s seat of Berowra in the event of a challenge.

Ruddock, who entered parliament in 1973 and served as immigration minister in the Howard government, is also under pressure to retire. Sources said a former executive director of the Menzies ­Research Centre, Julian Leeser, was likely to win preselection for Ruddock’s seat of Berowra in the event of a challenge.

Over the next week or so we will be exploring and documenting the monumental waste of our Senator’s and MP’s.  Each of our stars will have their own very unique spreadsheet and individual chart.
Why? Currently even though this information is actually on the government website it is so obtuse it may as well be useless. Until now!
Business class not good enough. $136,940 for charter flights in six months!
$670,897 for office fit out in main st Tamworth. Simply mind blowing.

The preferred Nationals Leader (at least that what he thinks) has decided that Business class and 1st Class Air travel is simply for the masses.

Barnaby decided that Air Charter is the only way to flit around the country $136,940 from January to June 2015 is not a bad spend in anyone’s book. Then to round out that spend leading National MP Barnaby Joyce found a way to spend $670,897 fitting out his humble office digs in main st Tamworth.

 

AirCharter_Disease (2)
We wait to see if Prime Minister Turnbull will act.
I’m not holding any strong hopes.

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